Getting married in Germany

Getting married in Germany

Getting married in Germany is not as simple as signing a pieces of paper and riding off on a white horse. There's nothing like the skipping of town to tie the knot in a cozy little chapel with someone who makes you squint twice to figure out if Elvis really is alive or not. There are lots and lots of paperwork to file. Marriage in Germany is a process, it requires you having the correct documentation and enough time to have everything approved, re approved and possibly re-re approved. If you and your partner are planning on eloping to Germany, ensure that you have taken the necessary measures way ahead of your planned date. If you're already living in Germany, it may be time to dig up those dusty folders and find all those documents you haven't had to look at in a long time. Remember that you are in Germany and so the official language is German. Where ever you plan on getting married, there is a high possibility that the ceremony will be carried out in German and thus opting for an interpreted may come in handy.

 

So what documents do you need?

·         Passport/Identification

·         Birth Certificate- translated copy as well as original copy

·         Certificate of no impediment

·         Baptismal Certificate if you are planning a church ceremony

·         Medical Certificate

 

You will be required to attend an interview at the Standesämter where you'll find out exactly what is needed, costs and all other necessary information. 

All documents are required to be translated by a certified German translator. The date of translation on these documents cannot exceed three months. 

For those who were previously married you may be required to present proof that your last marriage was legally dissolved. If your partner has passed away, a death certificate may be required. Be sure to have this document translated by a certified translator.

 

 

If you are planning on getting married before the age of 8 further documentation may be required. Provided this is legal in your home country, you may be obligated to submit additional forms as well as a letter from your parents giving consent.

Leave a couple of months for the filing to go through.

 

Don't be discouraged. Regardless of the time it may take and the filing that comes with it, once the hassle is over, Germany is a great place to get married. With so many beautiful castles, churches and cathedrals, your wedding will be unforgettable. You want your wedding to be perfect, everyone does, and as long as you've planned ahead, there is nothing stopping this day from being the best day of your life. And after the wedding comes the honeymoon. You've got so many places in Germany to snuggle up for a couple of days. Or, you could take a road trip and travel Europe with your new wife or husband. With enough planning your day will be as perfect as you intended it to be. 


 2539,    27  Oct  2014 ,   Living-family and environment in Germany

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